Your Christmas Shopping for a Song

Date posted: 04-Dec-2017

Aka - The Grand Christmas Shopping Expedition to Tiritiri Matangi Island Shop Dreading..

2018 Photo Comp opens for entries

Date posted: 27-Nov-2017

The 2018 Photo Competition is now open for entries. Click here (/2018-photo-competition-tiritiri-mat..

New reports on ruru nesting and Island conservation

Date posted: 02-Oct-2017

Two new reports have been added to the website. The first gives details of a summer students..

2018 calendars now available

Date posted: 27-Sep-2017

Our latest calendar, beautifully illustrated with images taken on the Island, is now available fo..

Guided walks for photographers

Date posted: 21-Jun-2017

For a wonderful day of wildlife photography please join us on Tiritiri Matangi Island for a Ph..

Ferry discounts for Supporters

Date posted: 18-May-2017

Tiritiri Matangi Island, the perfect winter's day trip. The birds are at their best, warm up w..

More kiwi for the Island

Date posted: 04-Apr-2017

In 1993 and 1995, sixteen little spotted kiwi were released on Tiritiri Matangi Island. The ma..

2017 Photo Competition

Date posted: 22-Mar-2017

It is that time of year again when we are looking for entries for our photo competition (and phot..

The 2017 concert

Date posted: 05-Feb-2017

This year's concert promises to be another wonderful and unique experience. Click here (/concert-..

Shorebird Film Festival at Devonport

Date posted: 26-Oct-2016

Click here (/miscellaneous documents/DevWaderFilms.jpg) for details of a forthcoming film festival c..

Gossamer Damselfly

Scientific Name: Ischnura aurora

Gossamer Damselfly - photography by Simon FordhamThis is the smallest damselfly of the six species found in New Zealand, measuring less than 25mm in length. The wharf pond is often host to a good population of the gossamer damselfly.

It has a distinctive colour pattern with males having a red abdomen with a blue patch at the tip, while females have a greenish abdomen.

The species prefers ponds with still water bodies with vegetated margins. Males are usually seen more frequently than females as the latter can range far and wide looking for new water bodies in which to lay their eggs.

The species is widespread, being found in India, Pakistan, China, Australia and some Pacific Islands. It is a relative new-comer to New Zealand, first recorded in 1926. It is widespread throughout the North Island but has only recently been recorded in the South Island, at Farewell Spit.

Photography by Simon Fordham ©