Hihi volunteer needed

Date posted: 18-Oct-2018

Would you like to volunteer with the Island's hihi team and learn from them how ..

2019 Calendars now available

Date posted: 05-Sep-2018

The new 2019 calendars are now available and this year's is better than ever! Th..

Winners of kokako photo competition

Date posted: 02-Sep-2018

The stunning winning photographs from those submitted to the competition as part..

Kokako Celebration

Date posted: 21-Jul-2018

(https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-great-kokako-story-celebrating-21-years-..

Kokako Photographic Competition

Date posted: 20-Jul-2018

KĊŒKAKO PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION Celebrating 21 years on Tiritiri Matangi To ce..

New monitoring reports published

Date posted: 19-Jul-2018

Reports on monitoring studies carried out over the past year have now been poste..

2018 Concert coming up soon

Date posted: 15-Feb-2018

Our 2018 concert will feature an afternoon of light classics and jazz courtesy of the Auckland Ph..

Wetapunga talk coming soon

Date posted: 05-Feb-2018

For the Social on 19 March the speaker will be Ben Goodwin of Auckland Zoo, who will talk about t..

Rat caught and now takahe released from pens

Date posted: 28-Jan-2018

Thankfully DOC staff Andre de Graaf and Polly Hall and their assistants have trapped the rat whic..

Your Christmas Shopping for a Song

Date posted: 04-Dec-2017

Aka - The Grand Christmas Shopping Expedition to Tiritiri Matangi Island Shop Dreading..

Shore skink

The shore skink (Oligosoma smithi) is found in the northern part of the North Island and, as its name indicates, it frequents shorelines, particularly beaches. It is active during the day, and is often found around driftwood and other debris. On boulder beaches they can become extremely common. They grow to around eight centimetres in length and are highly variable in their colouring - from almost black to pale cream. They can be heavily speckled.

The shore skink is one of three native skinks occurring on Tiritiri Matangi and the only one to have been introduced. Thirty shore skinks were released on the Island in 2006 and 23 in 2011. The population was monitored annually for three years from January 2011-January 2013, and further, less frequent surveys are planned. While the population has not increased dramatically, they appear to be holding their own and gravid females (like the one shown on the right) have been caught during each survey. They also appear to be spreading slightly from the original release site.

Photographs by Dylan van Winkel © (top left) and Roger Bray © (bottom right)